Dusit Thani , Sh Zayed Road , Dubai, UAE

04-3433333

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Thai Restaurants


, Dubai, UAE

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Dusit Residence Dubai Marina Marina , Dubai Marina , Dubai, UAE

04-4259999

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European Restaurants, International Restaurants, Thai Restaurants


S 16, Al Raha Mall , Channel Street , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-5561635

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Shop 19-20, Al Attar Shopping Mall , Karama , Dubai, UAE

04-3356584
050-5592893

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Filipino Restaurants, Thai Restaurants, Japanese Restaurants


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Shop 1-4, P27, France Cluster , International City , Dubai, UAE

04-4227438
050-5597218

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Food Court, Al Khail Mall , Al Quoz , Dubai, UAE

04-3397925
050-5574118

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Shop 12, MAT Khoory Bldg, Al Bada St , Satwa , Dubai, UAE

04-3868692
055-1012251

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Filipino Restaurants, Thai Restaurants, Japanese Restaurants


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Arab Bank building, Beside Fujairah Video Center , Fujairah Video Center , Fujairah, UAE

09-2231372

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Filipino Restaurants, Thai Restaurants


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, Madinat Zayed , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6763350

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Chinese Restaurants, Filipino Restaurants, Thai Restaurants



Page 1 of 10

Thai Restaurants

Thai cuisine can be described as four regional cuisines corresponding to the four main regions of the country: Northern, North-eastern, Central and Southern. Each cuisine share similar foods or foods derived from those of neighbouring countries and regions. Burma to the northwest is based on the Chinese province of Yunnan and Laos to the north, Vietnam and Cambodia to the east and Malaysia to the south of Thailand. In addition to these four regional cuisines, there is also the Thai Royal Cuisine which can trace its history back to the cosmopolitan palace cuisine of the Ayutthaya kingdom. Its refinement, cooking techniques and use of ingredients were of great influence to the cuisine of the Central Thai plains. Thai cuisine and the culinary traditions and cuisines of Thailand’‘s neighbours have mutually influenced one another over the course of many centuries. Regional variations tend to correlate to neighbouring states as well as climate and geography. Southern curries tend to contain coconut milk and fresh turmeric, while north-eastern dishes often include lime juice. The cuisine of North-eastern Thailand is similar to southern Lao cuisine whereas northern Thai cuisine shares many dishes with northern Lao cuisine and the cuisine of Shan state in Burma. Many popular dishes eaten in Thailand were originally Chinese dishes which were introduced to Thailand mainly by the Teochew people who make up the majority of the Thai Chinese. The dishes are chok, kuai-tiao rat na and khao kha mu. The Chinese also introduced the use of a wok for cooking, the technique of deep-frying and stir-frying dishes, and noodles, oyster sauce and soybean products. Dishes such as kaeng kari and kaeng matsaman are Thai adaptations of dishes originating in the cuisine of India and the cuisine of Persia. Thai cuisine has extremely varied and features many different ingredients and ways of preparing food. Thai food is known for its enthusiastic use of fresh (rather than dried) herbs and spices. Common herbs include cilantro, lemongrass, Thai basils and mint. Some other common flavours in Thai food come from ginger, galangal, tamarind, turmeric, garlic, soy beans, shallots, white and black peppercorn, kaffir lime and, of course, chilies. The ingredients found in almost all Thai dishes and every region of the country is nam pla, a very aromatic and strong tasting fish sauce. Fish sauce is a staple ingredient in Thai cuisine and imparts a unique character to Thai food. Fish sauce is prepared with fermented fish that is made into a fragrant condiment and provides a salty flavour. There are many varieties of fish sauce and many variations in the way it is prepared. Some fish may be fermented with shrimp and/or spices. Pla ra is also a sauce made from fermented fish. It is more pungent than nam pla, and, in contrast to nam pla which is a clear liquid, it is opaque and often contains pieces of fish. To use it in som tam is a matter of choice. Kapi is a Thai shrimp paste, a combination of fermented ground shrimp and salt. It is used, for instance, in red curry paste, in the famous chili paste called nam phrik kapi and in rice dishes such as khao khluk kapi. Nam phrik are Thai chilli pastes, similar to the Indonesian and Malaysian sambals. Each region has its own special versions. The wording nam phrik is used by Thais to describe any paste containing chillies used for dipping. Curry pastes are normally called phrik kaeng or khrueang kaeng, litt. Curry ingredients) but some people also use the word nam phrik to designate a curry paste. Red curry paste, for instance, could be called phrik kaeng phet or khrueang kaeng phet in Thai, but also nam phrik kaeng phet. Both nam phrik and phrik kaeng are prepared by crushing together chillies with various ingredients such as garlic and shrimp paste using a mortar and pestle. Some nam phrik are served as a dip with vegetables such as cucumbers, cabbage and yard-long beans, either raw or blanched. One such paste is nam phrik num, a paste of pounded fresh green chillies, shallots, garlic and coriander leaves. The sweet roasted chilli paste called nam phrik phao is often used as an ingredient in Tom yam or when frying meat or seafood, and it is also popular as a spicy "jam" on bread. The dry nam phrik kung, made with pounded dried prawns is often eaten with rice and a few slices of cucumber. The soy sauces which are used in Thai cuisine are of Chinese origin and the Thai names for them are loanwords from the Teochew language like si-io dam for dark soy sauce, si-io khao for light soy sauce and taochiao for fermented whole soy beans. Namman hoi is also a dish which has its origin Chinese. It is used extensively in vegetable and meat stir-fries. Thai cuisine doesn’‘t have any specific breakfast dishes. Thai breakfast consist of the same dishes which are eaten for lunch or dinner. Fried rice, noodle soups and steamed rice with something simple such as an omelette, fried pork or chicken, are commonly sold from street stalls as a quick take-out. The some of the dishes tend to be eaten only for breakfast they are Chok - a rice porridge commonly eaten in Thailand for breakfast. Khao khai chiao – is a dish made of omelet and white rice which is often eaten with a chilli sauce and slices of cucumber. Khao tom is a Thai style rice soup usually prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp. Khanom chin nam ngiao is a special dish of Northern Thailand, it is Thai fermented rice noodles served with pork blood tofu in a sauce made with pork broth and tomato with crushed fried dry chillies, pork blood, dry fermented soy bean, and dried red kapok flowers. Khanom chin namya is a round boiled rice noodles topped with a fish based sauce and eaten with fresh leaves and vegetables. Khao khluk kapi is rice stir-fried with shrimp paste, served with sweetened pork and vegetables. Khao man kai is prepared with rice steamed in chicken stock with garlic, with boiled chicken, chicken stock and a dipping sauce. Khao phat is One of the most common rice dishes in Thailand which is cooked usually with chicken, beef, shrimp, pork, crab or coconut or pineapple, or vegetarian. Khao phat American is American fried rice that can be found only in Thailand. Khao phat kai is fried rice cooked with chicken. Khao phat mu is fried rice cooked with pork. Khao phat pu is fried rice cooked with crab meat. Khao phat kung is fried rice prepared with shrimp. Khao phat naem is fried rice with fermented sausage, a typically dish from the Northeast. Khao soi is a crispy wheat noodles in sweet chicken curry soup. Kuai-tiao nam is a rice-noodle soup eaten at any time of day it is served with many combinations of proteins, vegetables, and spicy condiments. The word kuai-tiao originally designating only one type of noodle, the sen yai, is used colloquially for all rice noodles in general. Mi krop is deep fried rice vermicelli with a sweet and sour sauce. Phat khi mao is a noodles stir-fried with Thai basil. Phat si-io is rice noodles stir-fried with si-io dam and nam pla and pork or chicken. Phat thai is rice noodles pan fried with fish sauce, sugar, lime juice or tamarind pulp, chopped peanuts, and egg combined with chicken, seafood, or tofu. Kuai-tiao rat na is wide rice noodles in gravy with beef, pork, chicken, shrimp or seafood. Some of the Central Thai shared dishes are Ho mok pla, fish curry paté, Chuchi pla kaphong - snapper in chuchi curry sauce.Ho mok pla is a paté of fish, spices, coconut milk and egg, steamed in a banana leaf cup and topped with thick coconut cream before serving. Kai phat khing is a chicken stir-fried with sliced ginger.