Near Safeer Mall , Industrial Area 7 , Sharjah, UAE

06-5300230

4 stars - based on 1 reviews

Middle Eastern Restaurants


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Non-Veg

Al Mamzar Building , Abu Hail , Dubai, UAE

04-2667749
056-3338482

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Arabic Restaurants, Middle Eastern Restaurants


Beside Madina Mall , Qusais , Dubai, UAE

04-2554144
056-3338480

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

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Against Lulu Supermarket , Barsha , Dubai, UAE

04-3850101
050-9114747

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

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Opposite Arayana Hotel , Al Qasba , Sharjah, UAE

06-5773343
056-1489888

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

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Behind Labour Ministry, Hor Al Anz , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2664660

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Arabic Restaurants, Middle Eastern Restaurants


Ground Floor, Mamzar Center, Hor Al Anz , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2699910

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Middle Eastern Restaurants


Near Habib Bank AG Zurich , Al Dhafrah , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6416616

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Middle Eastern Restaurants, Arabic Restaurants


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Non-Veg

Al Sheebani Building, Al Seba Street , Dubai Marina , Dubai, UAE

04-5530501

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Arabic Restaurants, Middle Eastern Restaurants, Egyptian Restaurants


Hafeet Tower 2, Al Taawun Road , Al Taawun , Sharjah, UAE

06-5368950

0 stars - based on 0 reviews

Arabic Restaurants, Middle Eastern Restaurants



Page 1 of 5

Middle Eastern Restaurants

The cuisine is based on various countries and peoples of the Middle East and Western Asia. Some common ingredients include olives and olive oil, pitas, honey, dates, sumac, sesame seeds, chickpeas, mint and parsley. Some popular dishes include the kibbeh and shawarma. Cereals constitute the bases of the Middle Eastern diet, historically and today. Wheat and rice are the major and preferred sources of staple foods. Barley is common in the region and maize became common in some areas as well. Bread is a universal staple in the eaten, region, in one form or another, by all classes and groups, practically at every meal. Aside from bread, wheat is also used in the forms of burghul and couscous. Burghul is cracked wheat, made by partially cooking the wheat grains in water, then breaking it into pieces, drying it in an oven or in the sun, in different grades of size. Typically, it is cooked in water, with flavourings, much like rice. It is also used in making meat pies, and as an ingredient in salads, notably in tabbouleh, with chopped tomato, lemon, parsley, and oil. Freekeh is another common grain, made from immature green wheat. There are many types of rice produced and consumed in the region. Plain rice is served under grilled meats or with meat/vegetable stews. In more complex rice dishes, there are layers of meat, vegetables, sauces, nuts, or dried fruits. Butter and clarified butter are, traditionally, the preferred medium of cooking. Olive oil is prevalent in the Mediterranean coastal areas. Christians use it during Lent, when meat and dairy products are excluded, and Jews use it in place of animal fats such as butter to avoid mixing meat and dairy products. Most regions in the Middle East use spices. Typically, a stew will include a small amount of clove, cumin, cinnamon, and coriander. Black pepper is common, and chilli peppers are used occasionally, especially as a separate sauce, or as a pickle. Parsley and mint are commonly used in cooking and in salads. Varieties of thyme are common in Syria, Lebanon, and Palestine, and a mixture of dried thyme and sumac is a common breakfast item with oil and bread. Sumac is also sprinkled over grilled meat. Garlic is common to many dishes and salads. Lamb and mutton have always been the favored meats of the region. Pork is prohibited in Islam and Judaism and is rarely eaten in the region. Prominent among the meat preparations were the grilled meats, or kebabs. There are a wide variety of these grills, with many regional specialties and styles. The most common are the cubed cuts on skewers, known as shish kebab in most places. Chicken may also be grilled in the same fashion. Another common variety is kofta kebab, made from ground meat, sometimes with onions and spices, shaped around the skewer like a long sausage and grilled. Kebabs are typically a street or restaurant food, served with salad, bread, and pickles. It is not usually prepared in domestic kitchens. Meat and vegetable stews, served with rice, bulgur, or bread, are another form of meat preparation in the region. Kibbeh is a pie or dumpling made with meat and cereal. The most common are made with ground meat (typically lamb) and burghul, worked together like dough, then stuffed with minced meat that has been fried with onion, aromatics, and, sometimes, pine nuts or almonds and raisins. This can either be in the form of individual small dumplings, or in slices like a cake, baked on an oven tray with the stuffing placed between two layers of the dough. One variation is kibbeh naye, raw kibbeh, which is made by pounding raw meat and burghul together with seasoning and served with dips of lemon juice and chilli sauce. Vegetables and pulses are the predominant everyday food of the great majority of the people of the Middle East. They are boiled, grilled, stuffed, stewed, and cooked with meat and with rice. Among the green leafy vegetables, many varieties of cabbage, spinach, and chard are widely used. Root and bulb vegetables, such as onions and garlic, as well as carrots, turnips, and beets are equally common. Squash, tomato, eggplants, and okra are distinctive elements in the cookery of the region. Eggplant is often fried in slices and dressed in yogurt and garlic, or roasted over an open fire, then pulped and dressed with lemon juice, garlic, tahini, and cumin, a dish known as baba ghannoush. Tomato is the most ubiquitous ingredient in Middle Eastern cookery. It is used fresh in a variety of salads, cooked in almost every stew and broth, and grilled with kebab. Beans and pulses are crucial to the diet of the region, second only to cereals. The fava beans are eaten green and dried. Dried, they are boiled in one of the most popular Egyptian foods of foul medames, a domestic and street food, eaten for breakfast or any other meal, mashed and dressed in oil, lemon, and chilli. Similar dishes are found in all other parts of the region. The famous falafel, now popular in Europe and America, was originally made from dried fava, crushed and formed into a rissole with herbs and spices, then fried. It is also made from chickpeas, or a mixture of the two. Green fava are cooked like other green beans, boiled and dressed in oil, or stewed with meat. The haricot beans and black-eyed beans are also common. Lentils, split peas, and chickpeas are widely used in soups, with rice, in salads, or with meat. Hummus, made from chickpeas and sesame paste, originated in Syria or Lebanon. Stuffed vegetables are a dish most associated with the Middle East in the popular mind. They are called dolma, the Turkish word meaning stuffed, but also the Arabic mahshi. Grape chard, leaves, and cabbage are stuffed with rice, pine nuts, spices, ground meat, and then stewed in oil and tomato. Many vegetables are similarly stuffed and stewed or baked, such as squash, onion, tomato, eggplant, peppers, and even carrots. Arabs generally consume milk, fresh or soured. Yogurt, a Turkish contribution, is commonly consumed plain, used in cooking, used in salad dressing, or diluted as a drink. White cheese, like the Greek feta and haloumi, are the most common in the region. Meze is common throughout the Middle East. It consists of a number of small dishes that are picked at leisure: melon, nuts, cheese, various salads and dips, such as tabboule, hummus and mutabbal, pickles, and also more substantial items, such as grilled meat, kibbeh, and sausage. At first the region of the Fertile Crescent, the Middle East was where wheat was first cultivated, followed by barley, pistachios, figs, pomegranates, dates and other regional staples. Fermentation was also discovered here to leaven bread and make beer. As an intersection between Europe, Asia and Africa, this area has long been a hub of food and recipe exchange. At the time of Persian Empire the foundation was laid for Middle-Eastern food when rice, meat and fruits were incorporated into their diets. Figs, dates and nuts were brought by Arabian warriors to conquered lands, and spices were brought back from the Orient. The area was also influenced by dumplings from Mongol invaders; turmeric, cumin, garlic and other spices from India; cloves, peppercorns and allspice from the Spice Islands; okra from Africa; and tomatoes from the New World, via the Moors of Spain. Religion has also changed the cuisine as neither Jews nor Muslims eat pork, making lamb the primary meat. Since the Qur’‘an forbids alcohol consumption, the region isn’‘t noted much for its wine. Under the Ottoman Empire, the sweet pastries of paper thin phyllo dough and the dense coffee was brought to the area.