Park Inn Abu Dhabi , Yas Island , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6562222

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Mexican Restaurants


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, Bur Dubai , Dubai, UAE

04-3931622

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Mexican Restaurants


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The Dubai Mall , Downtown Burj Khalifa , Dubai, UAE

04-3308201

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LIU-15, Foodcourt 2 , Jebel Ali , Dubai, UAE

04-8870222

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Tex-Mex Restaurants, Mexican Restaurants


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Times Square Centre , Sh Zayed Road , Dubai, UAE

04-3418118

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Mexican Restaurants


Second Level, Food Court, The Dubai Mall , Downtown Burj Khalifa , Dubai, UAE

04-3308999

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Mexican Restaurants


8th Floor, In Rydges Plaza, Satwa Round About , Satwa , Dubai, UAE

04-3982274

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Mexican Restaurants


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Khalidiyah Mall , Al Khalidiya , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6354877

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Mexican Restaurants


, Green Community , Dubai, UAE

04-8853188

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Mexican Restaurants


Le Meridien Hotel , Tourist Club Area , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6443717

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Mexican Restaurants

Mexican cuisine has its own style of food that has its origin as Mexico. It is known for its varied flavours and colourful decoration with variety of spices and ingredients, most of which are native to the country. The Mexico cuisine has developed through thousands of years, blending indigenous cultures, with later European elements. The foods which are considered as staple food of Mexican are corn and beans. Corn is used to make masa, dough for tamales, tortillas, gorditas and many other corn-based foods. Corn is also eaten fresh, as corn on the cob and as a component of a number of dishes. Squash and chilli peppers are prominent in Mexican cuisine. Mexican cuisine is considered one of the most varied in the world, after Chinese and Indian. The most frequently used herbs and spices in Mexican cuisine are chiles, oregano, epazote, cinnamon, cilantro, and cocoa. Chipotle, a smoke-dried jalapeño chilli, is also common in Mexican cuisine. Many Mexican dishes also contain garlic and onions. Honey is a significant ingredient in many Mexican dishes like rosca de miel, a bundt-like cake and in beverages such as balché. Rice is the next most common grain in Mexican cuisine. The native alcoholic beverages to Mexico are mescal, pulque, and tequila. Beer in Mexico has a long history. Mesoamerican cultures knew of fermented alcoholic beverages including a corn beer. A long before the Spanish conquest European-style beer brewed with barley was introduced with the Spanish. The arrival of German immigrants and the short-lived empire of Austrian Maximilian I in the 19th century provided the impetus for the opening of many breweries in various parts of the country. Corn (maize), one of the world’‘s major grain crops might have originated in Mexico. At the time of conquistadores arrived in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan. They found that the people’‘s diet consisted largely of corn-based dishes with chiles and herbs, usually complemented with beans and tomatoes or nopales. The diet of the indigenous peoples of pre-Columbian Mexico also included chocolate, vanilla, tomatillos, jicama, squash, avocado, guava, papaya, sapote, mamey, pineapple, soursop, sweet potato, bell peppers, peanuts, agave, chili peppers, chicle, achiote, huitlacoche, sunflower seeds, turkey, and fish. Spanish conquistadors were invading Mexico, they introduced a variety of animals, chickens, goats, including cattle, sheep, and pigs. Rice, wheat, and barley were also introduced as were olive oil, wine, almonds, parsley and many spices. The imported Spanish cuisine was eventually incorporated into the indigenous cuisine. Before the arrival of the Europeans, the Mesoamerican diet did not include dairy products, so cheese making was unknown. The Spanish conquistadors introduced cow, goats, and sheep to them, which permanently made changing in Mexican dietary habits. The Spanish also brought techniques to make cheeses from their homeland, such as manchego. During the colonial period, cheese making was altered to suit the mixed European indigenous tastes of Mexicans were varying by region. This blending and variations have given rise to a number of varieties of Mexican cheeses. These are most popular in the country. Most cheeses are made with raw milk, which has caused some health issues. Cheeses are made at the home on small farms or ranches and by major dairy product firms. There are somewhere between twenty and forty different varieties of cheese in Mexico, depending on how one classifies. Oaxaca and panela, are made all over Mexico, but many are regional cheeses known only in certain parts on the country. Chocolate has an important part in the history of Mexican cuisine. The word chocolate was originated from Mexico’‘s Aztec cuisine, derived from the Nahuatl word xocolatl. Chocolate was first drunk rather than eaten. It was also used as currency and for religious rituals. The Maya civilization grew cacao trees and used the cacao seeds it produced to make a frothy, bitter drink. The drink, called xocoatl was often flavoured with vanilla, chilli pepper and achiote. Chocolate was an important luxury good throughout pre-Columbian Mesoamerica and cacao beans were often used as currency. With the recipes handed down the generations Mexicans incorporate chocolate into many of their meals, not using it simply as an ingredient for confections. Today chocolate is used in a wide array of Mexican foods, from savory dishes such as mole to traditional Mexican style hot chocolate and champurrados both of which are prepared with a molinillo. Mexican food varies by region according to its local climate and geography, ethnic differences among the indigenous inhabitants and different populations were influenced by the Spaniards in varying degrees. The north of Mexico is known for its beef, goat and ostrich production and meat dishes in particular the well-known arrachera cut. Northern Mexico is also known for its carne asada which is an item that consists of thin beef steak. The meat can be marinated with olive oil and sea salt or with spice rubs like lemon and pepper or garlic salt, lime and Worcestershire sauce, before being cooked on a grill. The dish is traditionall in the states of Sonora, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Coahuila, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Nuevo León, Durango, and Tamaulipas. In the Yucatán a unique natural sweetness is widely used as local produce along with significant use of achiote seasoning. In contrast, the Oaxacan region is known for its savory tamales, celebratory moles, and simple tlayudas. The mountainous regions of the West are known for goat birria - goat in a spicy tomato-based sauce. Central Mexico’‘s cuisine is largely influenced by the rest of the country. It has unique tasty dishes like menudo, pozole, barbacoa and carnitas. Southeastern Mexico is known for its spicy vegetable and chicken-based dishes. Cochinita pibil is a traditional Mexican slow-roasted pork dish from the Yucatán Península. The cuisine of Southeastern Mexico has a considerable Caribbean influence due to its location. Seafood is commonly prepared in states that border the Pacific Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico. The latter having famous reputation for its fish dishes à la veracruzana. Mexican ceviche has developed its own distinct styles that make it unique from the other variations available. The origin of ceviche is disputed but it’‘s a seafood dish popular in the coastal regions of the Americas.