Dune Centre, Al Diyafa Street , Satwa , Dubai, UAE

04-3453381

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Chinese Restaurants, Malaysian Restaurants


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Next to Spinneys, Marina Walk , Dubai Marina , Dubai, UAE

04-3674040

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Malaysian Restaurants, Chinese Restaurants, Thai Restaurants


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Behind ADCB , Salam Street , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6779911

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Chinese Restaurants, Malaysian Restaurants, Thai Restaurants


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Le Royal Meridien Abu Dhabi , Al Markaziya , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6950450

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Asian Restaurants, Chinese Restaurants, Japanese Restaurants, Malaysian Restaurants



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Malaysian Restaurants

Malaysian cuisine is influenced by many ethnicities. They are mostly similar to Indonesian cuisine. It has been influenced by Chinese, Indian, Thai. Malaysian cuisine has various types of recipes they are Apam balik is cooked with bread which puff with sugar, corn, and coarse nut in the middle. Ayam percik is cooked with grilled chicken stuffed with spicy sauce. Ayam goreng kunyit is deep fried chicken and marinated in a base of turmeric and other seasonings. Ikan bakar is cooked with grilled or barbecued fish with either chilli, kunyit (turmeric) or other spice based sauce. Ikan asam pedas is a sour stewed of fish, tamarind, chilli, tomatoes, okra and Vietnamese coriander. Kangkung belacan is water convolvulus wok-fried in a pungent sauce of shrimp paste and hot chilli peppers. Keropok lekor is the specialty of the state of Terengganu and other states on the east coast of Peninsula Malaysia, is a savoury cake made from a combination of batter and shredded fish. Kuih is usually called cakes, pastries and sweetmeats eaten as a snack during the morning or during midday, and are an important feature during festive occasions. Onde onde is a small round balls made from glutinous rice flour with pandan leaves essence, filled with palm sugar and rolled in fresh grated coconut. Kuih talam is a steamed layered coconut pudding made of rice flour, sago flour and coconut milk is cooked by steaming. Pulut inti is a kind of steamed dry rice pudding made from glutinous rice and coconut milk. It is traditionally wrapped in banana leaves folded into a pyramid shape, and topped with fresh grated coconut sweetened with palm sugar. Layer Cake is a sweet cake with many layers. Mee rebus is a famous noodle dish which consists of mee - a spaghetti like mixture of flour, salt and egg served with a tangy, spicy and sweet potato-based sauce. It is sometimes called mee jawa. Nasi Lemak is a dish cooked with steamed rice and coconut milk. Nasi berlauk is a Plain rice served with different variety of dishes. Nasi kerabu is a type of rice which is blue in color originated in Kelantan state. Nasi Paprik is originated from southern Thailand cooked with rice, lauk and chicken. Nasi Minyak is dish with multi-coloured rice usually eaten with rendang. Pulut is glutinous rice is a type of short-grained Asian rice that is especially sticky when cooked. Ketupat is a type of glutinous rice dumpling that has been wrapped in a woven palm leaf pouch and boiled. As the rice cooks, the grains expand to fill the pouch and the rice becomes compressed. Nasi goreng is fried rice. Nasi goreng kampung is a typical variant, traditionally flavoured with pounded fried fish though recently fried anchovies are used in place of it. Soto is a soup with mee hun or ketupat. This method of cooking gives the ketupat its characteristic form and texture. Ketupat is traditionally served by Malays at open houses on festive occasions such as Idul Fitri. Rendang is a spicy meat stew originating from the Minangkabau ethnic group of Indonesia, rendang is traditionally prepared by the Malay community during festive occasions. Roti jala is the name derived from the Malay word roti and jala. It is usually eaten as an accompaniment to a curried dish or served as a sweet with ‘‘serawa’‘. Serawa is made from a mixture of boiled coconut milk, brown sugar and pandan leaves. Sambal sotong is a squid cooked in a sambal-based sauce with chillies, shallots, garlic, stewed tomatoes, tamarind paste and belacan. Sayur Lodeh is a stew of vegetables cooked with lightly spiced coconut milk gravy. Sup kambing is a hearty mutton soup slow simmered with aromatic herbs, spices and garnished with fried shallots and fresh cilantro. Serunding is shredded meat in a form of meat floss with spices. Tempoyak is a popular Malay delicacy, it is durian extract which is preserved and kept in an urn. Malay has its speciality of making a paste called Rempah which is the spice pastes used in many dishes throughout the Southeast Asian region. Rempahs is made by grinding up fresh or dried spices and herbs to create a spice paste and then sauteed in oil to bring out the aromas. Noodles are another popular food in Malaysian cuisine. Noodles dishes are bi hoon, kuay teow, yee meen, mee and langka. Breads are eaten by most of the Malaysians as part of breakfast. Western style bread is a relatively new addition to the Malaysian diet, having gained acceptance in the last generation. The Malaysian Cuisine has many verities of non-vegetarian dishes. Malaysian poultry is handled according to Halal standards, to conform to the country’‘s dominant and official religion, Islam. Beef is common in the Malaysian diet. Beefs are commonly cooked in curries, stews, roasted, or with noodles. The special imported beef from Australia is prepared under supervision of the Government Supervised Muslim Slaughter System and fresh beef are available in supermarkets and hypermarkets. Pork is largely consumed by the non-Muslims’‘ in Malaysia like the Malaysian Chinese, natives like Kadazan, Iban, Orang Asli and expatriates. Pork can be bought in wet markets, supermarkets and hypermarkets. Mutton is also a part of the Malaysian cuisine. It generally refers to goat meat rather than sheep. The meat is used in dishes such as goat soup, curries, or stews. It is a popular ingredient in Malaysian Indian food. Various types of seafood are consumed in Malaysia, cockles, snails, cuttlefish, including shrimp or prawn, crab, squid, clams, sea cucumber and octopus. Almost all ethnic communities in Malaysia eat seafood, which is considered halal by Malaysian Muslims. Fish features in the Malaysian diet and most local fish is purchased the day after it is caught. Frozen fish is generally imported. Fish like salmon and cod has demand Malaysian table but are not caught by local fishermen. Imported fish are frozen and flown in as pieces or as whole fish and usually sold by weight. Vegetables are not always available for the whole year as Malaysia does not have four seasons. During the rainy season vegetable yield might decreases but does not stop completely. The vegetables can be purchased throughout the year but they are bit expensive at certain season of the year. Malaysia’‘s climate allows for fruit to be grown all year round. Most tropical fruits are either grown in Malaysia or imported from neighbouring countries. These are the major ingredients used in Malaysian cuisine.