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Argentinian Restaurants, South American Restaurants


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Argentinian Restaurants, Latin American Restaurants


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Argentinian Restaurants


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Argentinian Restaurants

The effects of globalization and the immigration of people from one part of the world to another are reflected in many areas. Cuisine-wise, the immigrants bring the recipes of their cultures to the already existing traditional recipes of the region that they are immigrating to and over the course of time, the recipes of the region and the newly brought in recipes fuse to make something distinctly new. The Argentinian cuisine is a cultural blending of Mediterranean influences, particularly those created by Italian, Spanish, and Arabic populations, within the wide scope of livestock and agricultural products that are abundant in the country. The country''s vast area and cultural diversity, have led to a local cuisine of various dishes. A feature of Argentine cuisine is the preparation of homemade food such as French fries, hamburgers, and pasta to celebrate special occasions like meetings with friends, or honoring someone. The custom of locally preparing food is handed down from generation to generation, and so it is not surprising that homemade food is also seen as a way to show affection. Argentinian restaurants include a great variety of cuisines, prices, and flavors. Large cities tend to host everything from high-end international cuisines, to bodegones which are inexpensive traditional hidden taverns, less stylish restaurants, and bars and canteens presenting a variety of dishes at affordable prices. The Argentinian cuisine is known for the high protein diet, particularly involving beef. Grilled meat from the asado is a staple, with steak and beef ribs particularly common. Chorizo, morcilla, chinchulines, mollejas, and other parts of the animal are enjoyed as delectable foods in the cuisine. Lamb and chivito are eaten more frequently than beef in Patagonia. Whole lambs and goats can be seen on the asado. Chimichurri is a sauce of herbs, garlic and vinegar which is habitually used as an accompaniment. Unlike other preparations, the Argentinian cuisine does not include chili in their version of chimichurri. Breaded and fried meats called milanesas are used as snacks, in sandwiches, or are consumed warm with mashed potatoes. Empanadas are small pastries of meat, cheese, sweet corn, and a hundred other fillings. These empanadas are a common sight at parties and picnics, or as starters to a meal. A variation is the empanada gallega. It is a big, round meat pie made most commonly with tuna and mackerel. Vegetables and salads are also eaten by Argentines with tomatoes, onions, lettuce, eggplants, squashes, and zucchini being common side dishes. Italian usuals like pizza and al dente pasta are eaten as commonly as beef. Fideos, tallarines, ñoquis, ravioles, and canelones can be purchased freshly made in many establishments in the larger cities. Italian-style ice creams are served in large parlors. In Chubut, the Welsh community which is known for its teahouses offers scones and torta galesa, which is somewhat akin to torta negra. Sandwiches de miga are delicate sandwiches made with crustless buttered white bread with very thinly sliced cured meat, cheese, and lettuce. A sweet paste called dulce de leche is a beloved national food. It is used to fill cakes and pancakes, spread over toasted bread for breakfast, or served is with ice cream. Alfajores are shortbread cookies sandwiched together with dulce de leche or a fruit paste. A dish in the Argentinian cuisine is called the policeman''s or truck driver''s sweet. This is cheese with quince paste or dulce de membrillo. Dulce de batata is a dish made of sweet potato or yam and this with cheese is the Martín Fierro''s sweet. A customary drink of Argentina is an infusion called mate. The dried leaves and twigs of the yerba mate plant are placed in a small cup which is also called mate. The cup is usually made from a gourd, but sometimes also from bone or horn. The drink is sipped through a metal or cane straw called a bombilla. Mate can be made sweet with sugar or flavored with aromatic herbs or dried orange peel to hide its bitter flavor. Hot water is poured into the gourd at near-boiling point to avoid burning the herb and spoiling the flavor. At family or small social gatherings, one mate is sometimes shared by the group, with the host preparing the mate to the liking of each guest. When one guest is done, the mate is given back to the host, who will then make one for another guest. This is considered an important social ritual. Mate cocido is the same leaf which is boiled and served as coffee or tea with milk or sugar to taste. Other typical drinks of the cuisine and region include wine which is occasionally mixed with carbonated water known as soda; tea and coffee are equally important. Quilmes is the national brand of pale lager, named after the town of Quilmes, Buenos Aires, where it was first produced. Common restoranes or restaurantes and rotiserias nearly anywhere in Argentina today, serve swiftly readied meals that in the course of the 20th century came to be known as minutas or short-order dishes. Some of the dishes contained within the group of minutas are bifes, milanesas, tallarines, ravioles, churrascos, bifes a caballo which is beef steak with two fried eggs, escalopes, ñoquis, milanesa a caballo, milanesa complete which is a milanesa with two fried eggs and a garnish of fries, suprema de pollo which is a kind of chicken milanesa, revuelto Gramajo, lengua a la vinagreta, sandwiches de miga, colchón de arvejas, and matambres. The cuisine features a variety of sandwiches that is near infinite. The most prevalent are those made of milanesa, baked ham and cheese, pan de miga, toast, pebetes, panchos, choripanes, and morcipanes. A different species of sandwich comes from Montevideo called the chivito and it contains no goat meat. Picadas, consumed at home or in bars, cafés, cafetines and bodegones are also widespread. They consist of an ensemble of plates that contain cubes of cheese which are typically from Mar del Plata or Chubut, pieces of salame, olives in brine, French fries, and maníes among other ingredients. These picadas are eaten accompanied by an alcoholic beverage. Fernet, beer, wine with soda are some common instances. The people of Argentina greatly enjoy helado which is akin to desserts like ice cream, and sorbet among other things. From the time of the Spanish colonies, there has existed in the Argentinian cuisine, a type of sorbet that is made from fallen hail or snow.