, Garhoud , Dubai, UAE

04-2834556

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Souk Qaryat Al Beri , Bein Al Jesrain , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-5581616

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Sanaiya , Mussaffah , Abu Dhabi, UAE

03-7211335

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Mirdif City Centre , Mirdif , Dubai, UAE

04-2840040

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Near King's Super Market , Hilton Road , Abu Dhabi, UAE

03-7644418

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Near KM Trading , Tourist Club Area , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6452229

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Opposite Egypt Air , Istiqlal Street , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6313400

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, Tourist Club Area , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6447770

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, Mussaffah , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-5526100

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Behind Etisalat , Al Khalidiya , Abu Dhabi, UAE

02-6342527

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Page 1 of 42

Arabic Restaurants

The Arabian cuisine is an exotic combination of the cuisines of the countries that make up the Arab world. The cuisine is defined as the various regional cuisines spanning the Arab World from Tunisia to Saudi Arabia, and also the Levantine, Egyptian, and other ethnicities. The Arabs of the Arabian Peninsula initiallydependedgreatly on diets of dates, wheat, barley, rice, and meat. Their diets had little range and asubstantial amount of emphasis was on yoghurt products likelabneh which is yoghurt without butterfat. As a cuisine, the Arabian cuisine has a strong emphasis on certain items. Meat-wise, lamb and chicken are the most used.Beef and camel are also used, but to lesser degrees. In some regions, other poultry is used.In the coastal areas, pork is whollyforbidden for Muslim Arabs because it is both a cultural taboo and prohibited under Islamic law.There are many Christian Arabs who also avoid pork because they never developed a taste for it.But this is not the case in Lebanon, where, in Christian neighborhoods, cold cuts of ham are frequently consumed.Dairy products are widely used in the cuisine, principally yoghurt and white cheese, butbutter and cream too are used extensively. The herbs and spices that are major parts of the cuisine include mint and thyme. Mint and thyme are often used in a mixtureknown asza''atar. They are used widely and almost universally.A lot less spices are used in the cuisine as compared to the Indian cuisine, and the amount and the kinds of spices usednormallydiffers from region to region. Some of the herbs and spices included in the cuisine are sesame, saffron, turmeric, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, and sumac;the spice mixtures in the cuisine include baharat. Hot beverages are consumed more than cold in the cuisine with coffee, mostly in Gulf countries, being on top of the list. Nevertheless, tea is also used in a great number of Arab countries. Tea is a more significant hot drink than coffee in Egypt and Jordan. Concerning grains of the cuisine, rice is the chief grain of the cuisine and is employed for many dishes while wheat is an important bread source;bulgur and semolina are some other grains that are also used extensively. Lentils are commonly used as also fava beans and chickpeas. The fruits and vegetables of the Arabic cuisine include vegetables such as cucumbers, eggplant, zucchini, okra, and onions;the fruits primarily include citrus fruits often used as seasoning for certain dishes.Other widely used consumables are olives as well as dates, figs, and pomegranates, anddates in particular are anessential staple in the Arabian diet. They are often eaten with coffee or other hot beverages. The nuts used in the cuisine include almonds, pine nuts, pistachios, walnuts, and peanuts. Of the greens in the cuisine, parsley and mint are prevalent as seasonings in many dishes, while spinach and mulukhiyah are used in cooked dishes. The most widespread dressings compriseseveralarrangements of olive oil, lemon juice, parsley, garlic, and tahini. Labanehwhich is thinned yoghurt is often garnished with mint, onion, or garlic. It is then served as a sauce with various dishes. Those spices that are emphasized in the Indian cuisine are, for a fact, mostly the same spices used in the Arabian cuisine. This is aconsequence of the heavy trading and historical ties that exist between the two regions. It is also because in recent times, many South Asian expats live in the Arab Gulf states. Crucial to any cooking in the Arabian cuisine is the notion of hospitality and generosity. The meals of the cuisine are usually large family affairs, with a lot of sharing and a good deal of warmth over the dinner table. Official dinners and celebrations in the cuisine usually involve large quantities of lamb, and every occasion necessitates large quantities of Arabic coffee. As is the case with cuisines all over the world, there are sundry regional differences in the Arabian cuisine. Mujadara in Syria and Lebanon is different from mujadara in Jordan or Palestine. Certain dishes likemansaf,which is the national dish of Jordan, are native to specific countries and seldom make an appearance in other countries. Cinnamon is used in meat dishes as well as in sweets such as baklava and this is in stark contrast to the cuisines of the Western countries. The desserts of the cuisine include different combinations of rice pudding and fried dough, andgroundnuts are common fillings for such treats. Saffron is an item in the cuisine that is used in almost everything, including sweets, rice, and beverages. Fruit juice is popular in the cuisine because of the climatic conditions of the region.Breakfast, in the cuisine, is often a quick meal that usually consists of bread and dairy products. It is often served with tea and sometimes with jam. The most used dairy products arelabneh and cream. The cream itself can be divided into two distinct varieties in the cuisine, i.e., kishta which is made of cow''s milk, andqaimar which is made of domestic buffalo milk. Labneh is served with olives, dried mint, and sprinkled with olive oil. Pastries such as manaqeesh, sfiha, fatayer, and kahi are sometimes eaten for breakfast. Flat bread with olive oil and za''tar is also a popular choice for breakfast in the cuisine. Most families in Arabian countries also consume hummus and falafel with pita bread. Conventionally, breakfast used to be a much heavier meal, particularly for the working class, and encompassed dishes such as lentil soup, or heavy sweets such as knafa. Fava beans cooked with chickpeas or garbanzo beans, garlic, lemon, and olive oil is a popular working class breakfast, andLablabi is another heavy garbanzo-based stew popular for breakfast in Tunisia.Lunch is thought to be the main meal of the day, and is eaten after the noon prayer. The meals do not have different courses,but salads and mezze are served as side dishes to the main meal. The latter typicallycomprises of a portion of meat, poultry or fish, a portion of rice, lentils, bread or bagel, and a portion of cooked vegetables, in addition to the fresh ones with the mezze and salad. The vegetables and meat are usually cooked together in a sauce to make maraq, which is served on rice. Most households add bread, whether other grains were available or not. Very wide assortments of drinks, such as shineena, karakaden, Naqe''e Al Zabib, irqsoos, tamr Hindi, as well as fruit juice are staples of the cuisine. Carbonated soda and fruit-based drinks have become popular. Alcohol is forbidden in some Arab countries while in some such as Lebanon, alcoholic beverages such as Araq or Almaza beer are popular.The lightest meal of the day is dinner, but due to shifting lifestyles, dinner has become more important in the cuisine. During Ramadan sweets are eatena lot more than usual.Sweets and fresh fruits are served between breakfast and dinner. But sweets in the cuisine are not exclusive to the period of Ramadan and most sweets are made all year round likeknafeh, baklava, and basbousa. But some, like Qatayef, are made specifically for Ramadan.Futuuror fast-breaking is the meal eaten at dusk when the fast is over. This meal of the cuisine consists of three courses.First, an odd number of dates based on Islamic tradition and this is followed by a soup.The most prevalentis lentil soup, but a wide selection of othersoups such as chicken, oats, freek, potato, maash, and others are also presented. The third course is the main dish which istypically eaten after an interval during which the Maghreb prayer is conducted. Excepting the fact that cold drinks are also served, the main dish is, for the most part, similar to lunch.