Somali Road , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2737432

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African Restaurants, Ethiopian Restaurants


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, Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2242533

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African Restaurants


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Behind DNATA , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2623773

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African Restaurants, Moroccan Restaurants


405, Mall of Emirates , Sh Zayed Road , Dubai, UAE

04-3471167

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Steakhouses Restaurants, African Restaurants


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Tiger Building , Al Nahda , Sharjah, UAE

06-5544757
050-2786536

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Indian Restaurants, African Restaurants, Arabic Restaurants, Fast Food, International Restaurants


Behind Al Jazeera Hotel, Al Ras , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2259986

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African Restaurants


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Al Khaleej Road , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2717610

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African Restaurants


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The Lodge, Oud Metha Road , Oud Metha , Dubai, UAE

04-3344159

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African Restaurants


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The Dubai Mall , Downtown Burj Khalifa , Dubai, UAE

04-3308088

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African Restaurants


Baniyas Square, Deira , Deira , Dubai, UAE

04-2227191

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African Restaurants, Indian Restaurants


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Page 1 of 2

African Restaurants

Africa is a vast expanse of land with terrain, flora and fauna, languages, societies, and people of differing kinds. This malady of fluctuations has differing influences depending on region of the continent and this reflects on the cuisine. By tradition, the innumerable cuisines of Africa aremishmashes of locally accessible fruits, cereal grains and vegetables, as well as milk and meat products. Certain parts of the continent have traditional diets that feature dominance of milk, curd and whey products. In a stark contrast, cow''s milk is rare and cannot be produced locally in Tropical Africa. This is because of various diseases that affect livestock. Contingentto the region, occasionally there are also quite substantialdissimilarities in the eating and drinking habits and tendencies throughout the continent''s many populations. The regions of Central Africa, East Africa, the Horn of Africa, North Africa, Southern Africa and West Africa each have their own idiosyncratic dishes, preparation techniques, and consumption habits.Central Africa remained generally free of culinary influences of the outside world until the late 19th century.The widespread adaptation of cassava, peanut, and Chile pepper plants which arrived along with the slave trade during the early 16th centuryare exceptions. These products have had a greatimpact on the local cuisine, but less on the preparation methods. Central African cooking has persisted to be mostly traditional. However, Central African cuisine also presents an array of dishes like other parts of Africa. The basic ingredients are plantains and cassava. Starchy foods like fufu,which are usually made from fermented cassava roots, are served with grilled meat and sauces. A selection of local ingredients are used while making other dishes like spinach stew, cooked with tomato, peppers, chilies, onions, and peanut butter. Cassava plants are also consumed as cooked greens. Groundnut or peanut stew is also sometimesmade. This containschicken,okra,ginger, and other spices. Another favorite of the region is Bambara, porridge of rice, peanut butter and sugar. Beef and chicken are among the favorite meat dishes, but game meat recipes containing crocodile,monkey, antelope and warthog are also served sporadically.The East African cuisine varies area-wise. In the inland savannah, the customary cuisine of cattle-keeping peoples is distinct in that meat foods are largely absent. Cattle, sheep and goats are regarded as a form of currency and a store of wealth. The livestock are not commonly consumed as food. But in some areas, some old-fashioned peoples consume the milk and blood of cattle, but hardly ever the meat. In other places, the peoples are farmers who grow a range of grains and vegetables. Maize is the basis of ugali which is the East African version of West Africa''s fufu. Ugali is a starch dish which isconsumed with meats or stews. Steamed, green bananas called matoke provide the starch filler of many meals in Uganda. About a thousand years ago, the Arabs settled in the coastal areas of East Africa. In these places, the Arabic influences are specifically reflected in the Swahili cuisine of the coast. This cuisine has a noted use of steamed cooked rice with spices in Persian style, use of saffron,cloves, cinnamon and several other spices, and pomegranate juice.More than a few centuries later, the British and the Indians came and brought with them their foods. This includes foodstuffs like Indian spiced vegetable curries, lentil soups, chapattis and a diversity of pickles. Just prior to the British and the Indians, the Portuguese had introduced practices of roasting and marinating along with the use of spices that turned the bland diet into aromatic stewed dishes. Citrus fruits were brought by the Portuguese from their Asian colonies. From their colonies in the New World, the Portuguese brought outlandishthings like chilies,peppers,maize,tomatoes,pineapple,bananas, and the domestic pig.Today, all of these are common elements in East African foods.The chief traditional dishes in Eritrean cuisine of the Horn of Africa are tsebhiswhich are stews served with injera, flatbreads made from teff, wheat, or sorghum; and hilbetwhich is paste made from legumes, mainly lentil andfababeans. Eritrean and Ethiopian cuisines, particularly in the northern half, are very similar. This is because of the joint history of the two countries. Eritrean food habits vary regionally:in the highlands,injera is the primary diet eaten daily among the Tigrinya, made out of a variation or blend of teff, wheat, barley, sorghum and corn, and resembles a spongy, slightly sour pancake;in the lowlands, the main dish is akelet which is a porridge-like dish made from wheat flour dough. The preeminently known Ethiopian cuisine is comprised of various vegetable or meat side dishes and entrées.Usually a wat, which is a thick stew, served atop injera;Tihloreadied from roasted barley flour is prevalent in Amhara, Agame, and Awlaelo. There is no pork or shellfish of any kind in the Traditional Ethiopian cuisine as they are forbidden in the Islamic,Jewish, and Ethiopian Orthodox Christian faiths. Somali cuisine comprises of an exotic mixture of varied culinary influences. The cuisine is a product of Somalia''s rich tradition of trade and commerce. But in spite of the variety, there vestiges of one thing that unites the various regional cuisines: all food is served halal. So there are no pork dishes, alcohol is not served, nothing that died on its own is eaten, and no blood is included. Qaddo or lunch in this region is often extravagant.Variations of bariis, the most popular being basmati,typically serves as the main dish. Spices like cumin,cardamom,cloves, cinnamon and sage are used to aromatize these diverse rice dishes. Xalwo or halva is a common confection made from sugar, cornstarch, cardamom powder, nutmeg powder, and ghee. Peanuts are also sometimes added to it to enhance the texture and flavor.Over the course of manycenturies, traders, travelers, invaders, migrants and immigrants have all affected the cuisine of North Africa. The Phoenicians of the 1st century brought sausages, the Carthaginians introduced wheat and semolina,the Berbers adapted this into couscous, andolives and olive oils were introduced before the arrival of the Romans. From the seventh century on, the Arabs introduced a variety of spices like saffron, nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger and cloves. All of which contributed and influenced the culinary culture of North Africa and it didn''t end there. The Ottoman Turks brought sweet pastries and other bakery products;and North Africa got potatoes, tomatoes, zucchini and chilies from the New World. In West Africa, the local cuisine and recipes remain deeply ingrained in the local customs and traditions. The cuisine includes ingredients like native rice, rice,fonio, millet, sorghum, Bambara and Hausa groundnuts, black-eyed beans, brown beans, and root vegetables such as yams, cocoyams, sweet potatoes, and cassava. Cooking is done in several ways: roasting,baking,boiling,frying, mashing, and spicing. The cuisine also has its own range of sweets and savories.The Southern Africa cuisine is sometimes called ‘‘rainbow cuisine''. This is because the food in this region is a blend of many cultures. The influences range from the cuisine of the indigenous African tribal societies, to the European and Asian. The elementary ingredients comprise seafood, meat products which include wild game, and poultry. It also includes grains, fresh fruits and vegetables. Thefruits of the cuisine include apples,grapes,mangoes, bananas and papayas,avocado,oranges, peaches and apricots. The desserts of the cuisine may simply be fruit. However, as exceptions, there are some morewestern style puddings like the Angolan Cocadaamarela inspired by Portuguese cuisine. The meat products of the cuisine include lamb, and game like venison,ostrich, and impala. The seafood of the cuisine and region